Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/162376
Authors: 
Schurer, Stefanie
Year of Publication: 
2017
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2017 [Issue:] 366
Abstract: 
Life skills, sometimes referred to as noncognitive skills or personality traits (e.g. conscientiousness or locus of control—the belief to influence events and their outcomes), affect labor market productivity. Policy makers and academics are thus exploring whether such skills should be taught at the high school or college level. A small portfolio of recent studies shows encouraging evidence that education could strengthen life skills in adolescence. However, as no uniform approach exists on which life skills are most important and how to best measure them, many important questions must be answered before life skill development can become an integral part of school curricula.
Subjects: 
human capital development
life skills
noncognitive skills
secondary and tertiary education
measurement error
JEL: 
J24
I26
P36
P46
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.