Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/162358
Authors: 
Harmon, Colm P.
Year of Publication: 
2017
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2017 [Issue:] 348
Abstract: 
Compulsory schooling laws are a common policy tool to achieve greater participation in education, particularly from marginalized groups. Raising the compulsory schooling requirement forces students to remain in school which, on balance, is good for them in terms of labor market outcomes such as earnings. But the usefulness of this approach rests with how the laws affect the distribution of years of schooling, and the wider benefits of the increase in schooling. There is also evidence that such a policy has an intergenerational impact, which can help address persistence in poverty across generations.
Subjects: 
compulsory schooling
returns to schooling
intergenerational
human capital
signaling
JEL: 
I26
I28
J10
J24
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.