Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/162341
Authors: 
Estrin, Saul
Year of Publication: 
2017
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2017 [Issue:] 330
Publisher: 
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), Bonn
Abstract: 
Foreign direct investment (FDI) has been argued to improve company performance and stimulate growth and employment. Transition economies of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) faced a desperate need to join the global economy, to improve their competitiveness and to create jobs through FDI. So, did the FDI come, and did it deliver what was expected? FDI levels were high for CEE, and for some resource-rich transition countries (e.g. Russia and some of Central Asia), but primarily delivered significant benefits (e.g. employment) for the former. FDI arrived much later to other transition countries (e.g. the former Soviet republics and the Balkans) and had much less impact.
Subjects: 
foreign direct investment
transition countries
unemployment
JEL: 
J6
P2
O4
F2
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.