Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/161927
Authors: 
Braun, Sebastian
Dwenger, Nadja
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 10-2017
Abstract: 
This paper studies how the local environment in receiving counties affected the economic, social, and political integration of the eight million expellees who arrived in West Germany after World War II. We first document that integration outcomes differed dramatically across West German counties. We then show that more industrialized counties and counties with low expellee inflows were much more successful in integrating expellees than agrarian counties and counties with high in inflows. Religious differences between native West Germans and expellees had no effect on labor market outcomes, but reduced inter-marriage rates and increased the local support for anti-expellee parties.
Subjects: 
Expellees
Forced migration
Immigration
Integration
Post-War Germany
JEL: 
J15
J61
N34
C36
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.