Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/161577
Authors: 
Newman, Carol
Page, John M.
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
WIDER Working Paper 2017/15
Abstract: 
Firms tend to cluster in close geographic proximity to each other to benefit from reduced transport costs, shared inputs, and productivity spillovers due to learning and technology transfers. Evidence from low-income countries suggests that such agglomeration economies may be substantial in endogenously formed clusters. This raises the question of whether spatial industrial policies can be designed to facilitate clustering. In this paper, we consider the case for creating Special Economic Zones (SEZs) in Africa. We document at the country level the state of current SEZ programmes and the policy measures in place for their promotion. We give an overview of the evidence on their success and provide a set of policy recommendations to improve SEZs performance.
Subjects: 
agglomeration
Special Economic Zones
spatial industrial policy
Africa
JEL: 
O14
O25
ISBN: 
978-92-9256-239-7
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
633.07 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.