Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/161434
Authors: 
Quis, Johanna Sophie
Reif, Simon
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
FAU Discussion Papers in Economics 12/2017
Abstract: 
A large literature aims to establish a causal link between education and health using changes in compulsory schooling laws. It is however unclear how well more education is operationalized by marginal increases in school years. We shed a new light on this discussion by analyzing the health effects of a reform in Germany where total years of schooling for students in the academic track were reduced from nine to eight while keeping cumulative teaching hours constant by increasing instruction intensity. The sequential introduction of the reform allows us to implement a triple difference-in-differences estimation strategy with data from the German Socio-Economic Panel. We find that increased weekly instruction time has negative health effects for females while they are still in school. However, after graduation, females even seem to benefit from reduced school years. We find no effects on males' health.
Subjects: 
education and health
instruction intensity
natural experiment
SOEP
JEL: 
I19
I21
I28
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.