Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/161368
Authors: 
Maclean, J. Catherine
Saloner, Brendan
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 10745
Abstract: 
We examine the early effects of U.S. state Medicaid expansions under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on substance use disorder (SUD) treatment utilization. We couple administrative data on admissions to specialty SUD treatment and prescriptions for medications used to treat SUDs in outpatient settings with a differences-in-differences design. We find no evidence that admissions to specialty treatment changed in expanding states relative to non-expending states. However, post expansion, Medicaid-reimbursed prescriptions for medications used to treat SUDs in outpatient settings increased by 33% in expanding states relative to non-expanding states. Among patients admitted to specialty SUD treatment, we find that in expanding states Medicaid insurance and use of Medicaid to pay for treatment increased by 58% and 57% following the expansion. In an extension to the main analyses we find no evidence that the expansions affected fatal alcohol poisonings or drug-related overdoses. Overall, our findings provide evidence on the early effects of the ACA on SUD treatment utilization with the newly-eligible Medicaid population.
Subjects: 
healthcare
public insurance
Medicaid
substance use disorders
JEL: 
I1
I13
I18
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
423.93 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.