Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/161102
Authors: 
Horn, Brady P.
Maclean, J. Catherine
Strain, Michael R.
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 10479
Abstract: 
This study investigates whether minimum wage increases in the United States affect an important non-market outcome: worker health. To study this question, we use data on lesser-skilled workers from the 1993-2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Surveys coupled with differences-in-differences and triple-difference models. We find little evidence that minimum wage increases lead to improvements in overall worker health. In fact, we find some evidence that minimum wage increases may decrease some aspects of health, especially among unemployed male workers. We also find evidence that increases reduce mental strain among employed workers.
Subjects: 
minimum wage
self-reported health
differences-in-differences
JEL: 
I1
I11
I18
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
324.42 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.