Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/161036
Authors: 
Gihleb, Rania
Lang, Kevin
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 10413
Abstract: 
Some economists have argued that assortative mating between men and women has increased over the last several decades, thereby contributing to increased family income inequality. Sociologists have argued that educational homogamy has increased. We clarify the relation between the two and, using both the Current Population Surveys and the decennial Censuses/American Community Survey, show that neither is correct. The former is based on the use of inappropriate statistical techniques. Both are sensitive to how educational categories are chosen. We also find no evidence that the correlation between spouses' potential earnings has changed dramatically.
Subjects: 
assortative mating
JEL: 
J12
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
337.53 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.