Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/159777
Authors: 
Zanella, Giulio
Banerjee, Ritesh
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
Quaderni - Working Paper DSE 938
Abstract: 
We study unique data from a dynamic natural experiment involving more than 7,000 American women to understand how a woman's propensity to perform an annual mammography changes over time after a co-worker is diagnosed with breast cancer. We find that in the year this event occurs the probability that a woman performs a mammography drops by about 8 percentage points, off a base level of about 70%. This impact effect is persistent during at least the following 2 years, is driven by cases of breast cancer diagnosed at non-early stages, and by the behavior of individuals who are less knowledgeable about health issues. This negative effect is confirm ed when we allow for serial correlation in screening behavior and when we estimate the effect of the treatment on the hazard of not screening, at the daily frequency. However, the effect vanishes in placebo experiments.
JEL: 
I10
C31
D03
Z10
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
726.47 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.