Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/157999
Authors: 
Bichler, Shimshon
Nitzan, Jonathan
Year of Publication: 
2012
Abstract: 
The United States is often hailed as the world's largest 'free market'. But this 'free market' is also the world's largest penal colony. It holds over seven million adults – roughly five per cent of the labour force – in jail, in prison, on parole and on probation. Is this an anomaly, or does the 'free market' require massive state punishment? Why did the correctional population start to rise in the 1980s, together with the onset of neoliberalism? How is this increase related to the upward redistribution of income and the capitalization of power? Can soaring incarceration sustain the unprecedented power of dominant capital, or is there a reversal in the offing?
Subjects: 
capital as power
crime
Georg Rusche
punishment
systemic crisis
unemployment
United States
URL of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Document Type: 
Conference Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
262.5 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.