Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/157851
Authors: 
Nitzan, Jonathan
Year of Publication: 
1990
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Papers, Department of Economics, McGill University
Abstract: 
The present essay is the second in a series of three papers which examine alternative approaches to inflation. Here we identify some of the principal criticisms expressed against neoclassical views on price behaviour and business behaviour. These challenges grew from the early discovery of ‘administered prices’ by Means and the subsequent findings by Hall and Hitch regarding ‘full cost’ pricing. The notions that industrial prices were relatively inflexible and that businessmen set those prices by imprecise rules of thumb stood in sharp contrast to the pristine simplicity of neoclassical models. Yet these attempts for greater realism seemed to undermine the prospects of constructing a coherent theory for prices.
Subjects: 
administered prices
business objectives
competition
corporate concentration
corporation
full cost
marginalism
market prices
monopoly
oligopoly
price theory
profit
target rate of return
URL of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.