Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/157782
Authors: 
Bichler, Shimshon
Nitzan, Jonathan
Year of Publication: 
2012
Citation: 
[Journal:] Journal of Critical Globalization Studies [ISSN:] 2040-8498 [Issue:] 5 [Pages:] 42-78
Abstract: 
Over the past century, the nexus of imperialism and financialism has become a major axis of Marxist theory and praxis. Many Marxists consider this nexus to be a prime cause of our worldly ills, but the historical role they ascribe to it has changed dramatically over time. The key change concerns the nature and direction of surplus and liquidity flows. The first incarnation of the nexus, articulated at the turn of the twentieth century, explained the imperialist scramble for colonies to which finance capital could export its excessive surplus. The next version posited a neo-imperial world of monopoly capitalism where the core's surplus is absorbed domestically, sucked into a black hole of military spending and financial intermediation. The third script postulated a World System where surplus is imported from the dependent periphery into the financial core. And the most recent edition explains the hollowing out of the U.S. core, a red giant that has already burned much of its own productive fuel and is now trying to financialize the rest of the world in order to use the system's external liquidity. The paper outlines this chameleon-like transformation, assesses what is left of the nexus and asks whether it is worth keeping.
Subjects: 
capital
dependency
finance
hegemony
imperialism
Marxism
monopoly
world systems
URL of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.