Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/157535
Authors: 
Boll, Christina
Jahn, Malte
Lagemann, Andreas
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
HWWI Research Paper 179
Abstract: 
Research on the gender earnings divide so far mostly focuses on the gender gap in hourly wages which, due to its snapshot nature, is inappropriate to capture the biographical dimension of gendered pay. With the 'gender lifetime earnings gap' (GLEG), we introduce a new measure that meets this requirement. Based on a group of 93,511 German individuals born 1950-64 from the 'Sample of Integrated Labour Market Biographies' (SIAB 7510), we find that at the end of the employment career, women accumulated 49.8 % less earnings than men. Thus, the GLEG is more than twice as high as the current German gender pay gap. The GLEG is the largest (smallest) at the bottom (top) of the earnings distribution. It most prominently widens during the period of family formation (age 25-35). Relatedly, gender differences in endowments, mainly in terms of experience and hours, answer for three quarters of the GLEG. For younger cohorts, family breaks tend to lose importance whereas the role of work hours remains unchanged. Furthermore, the GLEG notably differs between occupational segments.
Subjects: 
lifetime earnings
Blinder & Oaxaca decomposition
occupational segments
cohort analysis
gender
life course
wage distribution
wage gap
JEL: 
D31
J31
J16
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
727.56 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.