Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/157216
Authors: 
Osiński, Jerzy
Karbowski, Adam
Year of Publication: 
2017
Citation: 
[Journal:] PLoS ONE [ISSN:] 1932-6203 [Volume:] 12 [Issue:] 2 [Pages:] e0170387
Abstract: 
Based on the assumption that social distance and time are dimensions of psychological distance important for altruistic choices it was predicted that enhancement of altruism due to delaying rewards when choosing between a reward for oneself and for another person would be more pronounced the greater the social distance between the subject and another person. In order to test this hypothesis, social discounting using hypothetical monetary rewards and manipulation of social distance and reward delay was measured in a group of 161 college students. The results indicate that delaying rewards increasingly enhances preference for altruistic choices as the social distance between subject and beneficiary grows.
Subjects: 
altruism
discounting
JEL: 
D01
D03
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.