Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/156288
Authors: 
Rebeira, Mayvis
Grootendorst, Paul V.
Coyte, Peter C.
Aguirregabiria, Victor
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
Economics Discussion Papers 2017-12
Abstract: 
What effect does rising income inequality have on mortality rates in developed countries? In particular, does the rise of the super-wealthy or the top 0.01% of the population effect overall health of the population? This paper focuses on the effect of rising income inequality on mortality rates of men and women in a subset of OECD countries over six decades from 1950-2008. The authors used adult mortality as the outcome measure and the inverted Pareto-Lorenz coefficient as the preferred measure of income inequality and obtained the latest and precise data on the income inequality measure. They used a panel co-integration econometric framework to address some of the challenges posed by more conventional methods. The findings show that for industrialized countries with co-integrated series, income inequality appears to have a long-run significant negative effect on mortality risk for both men and women, that is, an increase in income inequality does not appear to lower annualized adult mortality rates.
Subjects: 
income inequality
mortality
health
panel co-integration
JEL: 
I1
C1
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
375.34 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.