Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/154678
Authors: 
Burkhauser, Richard V.
Daly, Mary C.
McVicar, Duncan
Wilkins, Roger
Year of Publication: 
2014
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA Journal of Labor Policy [ISSN:] 2193-9004 [Volume:] 3 [Year:] 2014 [Pages:] 1-30
Abstract: 
Unsustainable growth in program costs and beneficiaries, together with a growing recognition that even people with severe impairments can work, led to fundamental disability policy reforms in the Netherlands, Sweden, and Great Britain. In Australia, rapid growth in disability recipiency led to more modest reforms. Here we describe the factors driving unsustainable DI program growth in the U.S., show their similarity to the factors that led to unsustainable growth in these other four OECD countries, and discuss the reforms each country implemented to regain control over their cash transfer disability program. Although each country took a unique path to making and implementing fundamental reforms, shared lessons emerge from their experiences.
Subjects: 
Disability
Cross-national policy
Social Security Disability Insurance
JEL: 
J14
J18
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.