Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/152573
Authors: 
Fratzscher, Marcel
Year of Publication: 
2002
Series/Report no.: 
ECB Working Paper 139
Abstract: 
This paper analyzes the role of contagion in the currency crises in emerging markets during the 1990s. It employs a non-linear Markov-switching model to conduct a systematic comparison and evaluation of three distinct causes of currency crises: contagion, weak economic fundamentals, and sunspots, i.e. unobservable shifts in agents' beliefs. Testing this model empirically through Markov-switching and panel data models reveals that contagion, i.e. a high degree of real integration and financial interdependence among countries, is a core explanation for recent emerging market crises. The model has a remarkably good predictive power for the 1997-98 Asian crisis. The findings suggest that in particular the degree of financial interdependence and also real integration among emerging markets are crucial not only in explaining past crises but also in predicting the transmission of future financial crises.
JEL: 
F30
E60
E65
E44
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
399.25 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.