Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/152330
Authors: 
Cho, Insoo
Year of Publication: 
2014
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA Journal of Labor Economics [ISSN:] 2193-8997 [Volume:] 3 [Year:] 2014 [Pages:] 1-15
Abstract: 
We investigate whether nonprofit and for-profit entrepreneurs share similar observable and unobservable skills. In JLE 23:649-680, 2005 "Jacks-of-all-Trades" model of entrepreneurship, individuals with more diverse academic and occupational training are more likely to become entrepreneurs, while more narrowly trained individuals become employees. Data on college graduates from a single university show that observed diverse skills increase the probability that the graduate will open both for-profit and nonprofit venture. Positive correlation in the errors that jointly affect for-profit and nonprofit start-ups is consistent with the existence of an unobserved entrepreneurial skill, a key factor underlying Lazear's theory.
Subjects: 
Nonprofit
For-profit
Entrepreneurship
Jacks-of-All-Trades
Balanced skills
JEL: 
J24
L3
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
566.35 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.