Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/152327
Authors: 
Sila, Urban
Sousa, Ricardo M.
Year of Publication: 
2014
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA Journal of Labor Economics [ISSN:] 2193-8997 [Volume:] 3 [Year:] 2014 [Pages:] 1-27
Abstract: 
We investigate whether workers adjust hours worked in response to windfall gains using data from the European Household Panel. The results suggest that a rise in unearned income has a negative (although small) effect on working hours. In particular, after receiving a windfall gain, individuals are more likely to drop out of the labour force and the effects become larger as the size of windfall increases. Furthermore, the empirical findings show that the impact of windfall gains on labour supply: (i) is more important for young and old individuals, (ii) is most negative for married individuals with young children, (iii) but can be positive for single individuals without children at the age of around 40 years. The latter effect can be explained by individuals using the windfall gain to set up their own business and become self-employed.
Subjects: 
Windfall gains
Working hours
JEL: 
D12
J22
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
791.46 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.