Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/151020
Authors: 
Groh-Samberg, Olaf
Year of Publication: 
2007
Citation: 
[Journal:] Weekly Report [ISSN:] 1860-3343 [Year:] 2007 [Volume:] 3 [Issue:] 4 [Pages:] 21-26
Abstract: 
Income poverty in Germany has reached its highest level for twenty years. This statistic is often seen as proof of the existence and growth of a 'decoupled underclass'. In other scenarios large sections of society appear to be facing collapse into poverty. If the duration of individual phases of poverty and the different dimensions of life in which need can occur are included in the analysis persistent poverty does appear to be on the increase. An increase in vulnerability, that is, swinging between 'middle class' and 'poor' is not evident. Those mainly affected by persistent poverty are still workers, particularly working class families with a background in migration or with several children. But to interpret poverty in Germany as the problem of a culturally destitute underclass or to dramatize it as the whole of society facing collapse is unrealistic.
Subjects: 
Poverty
Vulnerability
Social Class
Deprivation
JEL: 
I32
D31
J60
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.