Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/150734
Authors: 
Leuze, Kathrin
Rusconi, Allessandra
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 187
Abstract: 
Occupational sex segregation is a persistent source of social inequalities. The increasing participation of women in tertiary education and rising female employment rates, however, have given hope that gender inequalities will decline as a result of growing female opportunities for high skill employment in the service sector, e.g. the professions. This paper asks whether such optimistic accounts are justified by comparing male and female professional career trajectories in Germany. Our main assumptions hold that, even today, strong gender differences continue to exist between public and private sector professions, which are further aggravated by different forms of family commitment. Overall, our analyses demonstrate that even among highly qualified men and women, important patterns of sex segregation are present. Aninitial horizontal segregation between public and private sectors brings about "equal, but different" career prospects, which in the phase of family formation turn into vertical segregation, promoting "different and therefore unequal" labor market chances.
Subjects: 
professions
sex segregation
labor market outcomes
family formation
tertiary education
German
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
322.02 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.