Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/150368
Authors: 
Gill, David
Prowse, Victoria
Year of Publication: 
2014
Citation: 
[Journal:] Quantitative Economics [ISSN:] 1759-7331 [Volume:] 5 [Year:] 2014 [Issue:] 2 [Pages:] 351-376
Abstract: 
In a real effort experiment with repeated competition we find striking differences in how the work effort of men and women responds to previous wins and losses. For women, losing per se is detrimental to productivity, but for men, a loss impacts negatively on productivity only when the prize at stake is big enough. Responses to luck are more persistent and explain more of the variation in behavior for women, and account for about half of the gender performance gap in our experiment. Our findings shed new light on why women may be less inclined to pursue competition-intensive careers.
Subjects: 
Labor market outcomes
gender gap
experiment
real effort
career development
competition
luck
productivity
relative performance evaluation
tournament
winning
losing
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.