Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/149944
Authors: 
Asongu, Simplice
Nwachukwu, Jacinta C.
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
AGDI Working Paper WP/16/020
Abstract: 
This study complements existing literature on the aid-institutions nexus by focusing on political rights, aid volatilities and the post-Berlin Wall period. The findings show that while foreign aid does not have a significant effect on political rights, foreign aid volatilities do mitigate democracy in recipient countries. Such volatilities could be used by populist parties to promote a neocolonial agenda, instill nationalistic sentiments and consolidate their grip on power. This is especially the case when donors are asking for standards that majority of the population do not want and political leaders are unwilling to implement them. The empirical evidence is based on 53 African countries for the period 1996-2010. As a main policy implication, creating uncertainties in foreign aid for political rights enhancement in African countries may achieve the opposite results. Other implications are discussed including the need for an ‘After Washington consensus’.
Subjects: 
Uncertainty
Foreign aid
Political Rights
Development
Africa
JEL: 
C53
F35
F47
O11
O55
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.