Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/149121
Authors: 
Büchel, Konstantin
von Ehrlich-Treuenstätt, Maximilian
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Papers, Universität Bern, Department of Economics 16-08
Abstract: 
Social interactions are considered pivotal to urban agglomeration forces. This study employs a unique dataset on mobile phone calls to examine how social interactions differ across cities and peripheral areas. We first show that geographical distance is highly detrimental to interpersonal exchange. We then reveal that individuals residing in high-density locations do not benefit from larger social networks, but from a more efficient structure in terms of higher matching quality and lower clustering. These results are derived from two complementary approaches: Based on a link Formation model, we examine how geographical distance, network overlap, and sociodemographic (dis)similarities impact the likelihood that two agents interact. We further decompose the effects from individual, location, and time specific determinants on micro-level network measures by exploiting information on mobile phone users who change their place of residence.
Subjects: 
Social Interactions
Agglomeration Externalities
Network Analysis
Sorting
JEL: 
R1
R23
Z13
D85
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.