Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/149096
Authors: 
Penney, Jeffrey
Tolley, Erin
Goodyear-Grant, Elizabeth
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
Queen's Economics Department Working Paper 1370
Abstract: 
We analyze the results of a large-scale experiment wherein subjects participate in a hypothetical primary election and must choose between two fictional candidates who vary by sex and race. We find evidence of affinities along these dimensions in voting behaviour. A number of phenomena regarding these affinities and their interactions are detailed and explored. We find that they compete with each other on the basis of race and gender. Neuroeconomic metrics suggest that people who vote for own race candidates tend to rely more on heuristics than those who do not.
Subjects: 
gender
prejudice
race
voting
JEL: 
D72
C90
J15
J16
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
609.25 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.