Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/148878
Authors: 
Liepmann, Hannah
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
SFB 649 Discussion Paper 2016-042
Abstract: 
How does a negative labor demand shock impact individual-level fertility? I analyze this question in the context of the East German fertility decline after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. Exploiting di erential pressure for restructuring across industries, I nd that throughout the 1990s, women more severely impacted by the demand shock had more children on average than their counterparts who were less severely impacted. I argue that in uncertain economic circumstances, women with relatively more favorable labor market outcomes postpone childbearing in order not to put their labor market situations at further risk. This mechanism is relevant for all quali cation groups, including high-skilled women. There is some evidence for an impact on completed fertility.
Subjects: 
Fertility
Labor Demand Shock
Industrial Restructuring
East Germany
JEL: 
J13
J23
P36
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
842.77 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.