Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/148457
Authors: 
Broecke, Stijn
Year of Publication: 
2016
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2016 [Issue:] 232
Abstract: 
Policymakers in many OECD countries are increasingly concerned about high and rising inequality. Much of the evidence (as far back as Adam Smith’s The Wealth of Nations) points to the importance of skills in tackling wage inequality. Yet a recent strand of the research argues that (cognitive) skills explain little of the cross-country differences in wage inequality. Does this challenge the received wisdom on the relationship between skills and wage inequality? No, because this recent research fails to account for the fact that the price of skill (and thus wage inequality) is determined to a large extent by the match of skill supply and demand.
Subjects: 
skills
wage inequality
labor market institutions
JEL: 
I24
J08
J24
J31
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.