Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/148445
Authors: 
Le Goff, Maelan
Year of Publication: 
2016
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2016 [Issue:] 220
Abstract: 
Migrants’ remittances to developing countries have increased in recent decades, partly due to reduced transactions costs and improved living conditions in host countries. The feminization of international migration represents yet another explanation. Despite the difficulties female migrants encounter in the labor market, their total remittances may be higher and more resilient than those of male migrants, owing to these women’s stronger links to family members left behind and self-insurance motives. Policymakers need to understand how this new and significant upward trend in female migration could affect the economic and social development of home countries.
Subjects: 
remittances
female migrants
developing countries
JEL: 
F22
F24
J16
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.