Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/148327
Authors: 
Jacob, Thabit
Pedersen, Rasmus Hundsbæk
Maganga, Faustin
Kweka, Opportuna
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
DIIS Working Paper 2016:12
Abstract: 
Under recent policy reforms in Tanzania's extractive sectors, the state is taking centre stage in the governance and regulation of minerals and oil/gas/petroleum resources. Through state-owned companies it is also re-emerging as a more direct investor in these sectors. This affects the rights of other stakeholders, not least the multinational companies. This paper analyses the key features of contemporary mining and petroleum legislation and their implications for smallholders, investors and state actors. It argues that recent return of the state signifies a major shift in bargaining power between the state and other actors, especially multinational companies. At the same time, while smallholders saw a gradual strengthening of their rights, rights to land in extractive investments are still precarious. For local communities, although local content and CSR provisions have been strengthened, local content is often reinterpreted to mean national content. This may potentially disfavour communities that bear burdens of extraction at the sub-national levels.
Subjects: 
Land
Mining
Petroleum
Gas
Rights
Investments
Tanzania
ISBN: 
978-87-7605-851-7
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.