Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/147957
Authors: 
Anukriti, S
Bhalotra, Sonia R.
Tam, Hiu
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 10271
Abstract: 
The introduction of prenatal sex-detection technologies in India has led to a phenomenal increase in abortion of female fetuses. We investigate their impact on son-biased fertility stopping behavior, parental investments in girls relative to boys, and the relative chances of girls surviving after birth. We find a moderation of son-biased fertility, erosion of gender gaps in breastfeeding and immunization, and complete convergence in the post-neonatal mortality rates of boys and girls. For every five aborted girls, we estimate that roughly one additional girl survives to age five. The results are not driven by endogenous compositional shifts, being robust to the inclusion of mother fixed effects. Our findings have implications not only for counts of missing girls but also for the later life outcomes of girls, conditioned by greater early life investments in them.
Subjects: 
abortion
child mortality
fertility
gender
health
India
missing girls
parental investments
prenatal sex detection
sex-selection
ultrasound
JEL: 
I15
J13
J16
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.42 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.