Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/147777
Authors: 
Guest, Jonathan
Year of Publication: 
2015
Citation: 
[Journal:] Cogent Economics & Finance [ISSN:] 2332-2039 [Volume:] 3 [Year:] 2015 [Issue:] 1 [Pages:] 1-16
Abstract: 
In this paper, the author reflects on his 10 years' experience of using games and experiments and in the process develops a type of practitioner's guide. The existing quantitative and qualitative evidence on the impact of using games on student learning is reviewed. On balance, a positive effect, on measures of attainment, is found in the literature. Given these findings, it is surprising that there is also evidence in the UK and US that they are not widely used. Some factors are discussed that might deter tutors from employing them. Unsurprisingly, one of these is the additional cost, which might make the use of online games seem more attractive, given the way results can be automatically recorded. However, some relatively low-cost paperbased games were found to have significant advantages. In particular, they appear to facilitate social interaction which has a positive impact on student motivation and learning. One popular and effective paper-based game is discussed in some detail. A number of recommendations are provided on how to implement the game in order to maximise the learning benefits it can provide. Some ideas on how to maximise the learning benefits from using games more generally are also considered.
Subjects: 
active learning
learning by doing
economic games and experiments
online vs. paper-based games
public good games
voluntary contribution mechanism
economic tools for teaching
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.