Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/147375
Authors: 
Proto, Eugenio
Rustichini, Aldo
Sofianos, Andis
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo Working Paper 6121
Abstract: 
Intelligence and personality significantly affect social outcomes of individuals. We study how and why these traits affect the outcome of groups, looking specifically at how these characteristics operate in repeated interactions providing opportunity for profitable cooperation. Our experimental method creates two groups of subjects who are similar but have different levels of certain traits, such as higher or lower levels of intelligence, Conscientiousness and Agreeableness. We find that intelligence has a large and positive long-run effect on cooperative behavior when there is a conflict between short-run gains and long-run losses. Initially similar, cooperation rates for groups with different intelligence levels diverge, declining in groups of lower intelligence, and increasing to reach almost full cooperation levels in groups of higher intelligence. Cooperation levels exhibited by more intelligent subjects are payoff sensitive, and not unconditional. Personality traits have a natural, significant although transitory effect on cooperation rates.
Subjects: 
repeated prisoner's dilemma
cooperation
intelligence
JEL: 
C73
C91
C92
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.