Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/146480
Authors: 
Carrillo, Paul E.
López, Andrea
Malik, Arun S.
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
IDB Working Paper Series IDB-WP-698
Abstract: 
Driving restriction programs have been implemented in many cities around the world to alleviate pollution and congestion problems. Enforcement of such programs is costly and can potentially displace policing resources used for crime prevention and crime detection. Hence, driving restrictions may increase crime. To test this hypothesis, this paper exploits both temporal and spatial variation in the implementation of Quito, Ecuador's Pico y Placa program and evaluates its effect on crime. Both difference-in-difference and spatial regression discontinuity estimates provide credible evidence that driving restrictions can increase crime rates.
Subjects: 
Crime
Difference-in-Differences
Regression discontinuity
Crime displacement
JEL: 
C20
Q52
R28
R48
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo/legalcode
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.