Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/145440
Authors: 
Kelly, Elaine
Stoye, George
Vera-Hernández, Marcos
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IFS Working Papers W15/21
Abstract: 
Health spending per capita in England has more than doubled since 1997, yet relatively little is known about how that spending is distributed across the population. This paper uses administrative National Health Service (NHS) hospital records to examine key features of public hospital spending in England. We describe how costs vary across the lifecycle, and the concentration of spending among people and over time. We find that costs per person start to increase after age 50 and escalate after age 70. Spending is highly concentrated in a small section of the population: with 32% of all hospital spending accounted for by 1% of the general population, and 18% of spending by 1% of all patients. There is persistence in spending over time with patients with high spending more likely to have spending in subsequent years, and those with zero expenditures more likely to remain out of hospital.
Subjects: 
Health
public spending
hospitals
JEL: 
H51
I10
I11
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
707.35 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.