Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/145247
Authors: 
Bakker, Jan David
Parsons, Christopher
Rauch, Ferdinand
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 10113
Abstract: 
Under apartheid, black South Africans were severely restricted in their choice of location and many were forced to live in homelands. Following the abolition of apartheid they were free to migrate. Given gravity, a town nearer to the homelands can be expected to receive a larger inflow of people than a more distant town following the removal of mobility restrictions. Exploting this exogenous variation, we study the effect of migration on urbanisation and the distribution of population. In particular, we test if migration inflows led to displacement, path dependence, or agglomeration in destination areas. We find evidence for path dependence in the aggregate, but substantial heterogeneity across town densities. An exogenous population shock leads to an increase of the urban relative to the rural population, which suggests that exogenous migration shocks can foster urbanisation in the medium run.
Subjects: 
economic geography
migration
urbanisation
natural experiment
JEL: 
R12
R23
N97
O18
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
871.27 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.