Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/145197
Authors: 
Islam, Asadul
Stillman, Steven
Worswick, Christopher
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 10063
Abstract: 
The impact that an unforeseen event has on household welfare depends on the extent to which household members can take actions to mitigate the direct impact of the shock. In this paper, we use nine years of longitudinal data from the Household Income Labour Dynamics of Australia (HILDA) survey to examine the impact of job displacement and serious health problems on: individual labour supply and incomes, household incomes and food expenditure. We extend on the previous literature by examining whether mitigation strategies and their effectiveness differs for the native-born and immigrants. Immigrants make up nearly one-quarter of the Australian population and there are a number of reasons to suspect that they may be less able to mitigate adverse shocks than the native-born.
Subjects: 
job loss
income
consumption
labour supply
disability
JEL: 
J65
I31
J15
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
164.31 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.