Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/145164
Authors: 
Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina
Arenas-Arroyo, Esther
Sevilla, Almudena
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 10030
Abstract: 
Over the past two decades immigration enforcement has grown exponentially in the United States. We exploit the geographical and temporal variation in a novel index of the intensity of immigration enforcement between 2005 and 2011 to show how the average yearly increase in interior immigration enforcement over that time period raised the likelihood of living in poverty of households with U.S. citizen children by 4 percent. The effect is robust to a number of identification tests accounting for the potential endogeneity of enforcement policies, and is primarily driven by police-based immigration enforcement measures adopted at the local level such as 287(g) agreements.
Subjects: 
immigration enforcement
poverty
U.S. citizen children
unauthorized parents
JEL: 
I38
J15
K37
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
497.77 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.