Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/144688
Authors: 
Kerber, Wolfgang
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
Joint Discussion Paper Series in Economics 23-2016
Abstract: 
The "UsedSoft" decision of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) about the right of a buyer of a downloaded copy of a software to resell this copy triggered a controversial discussion about the applicability of the "exhaustion" rule (US: first-sale doctrine) to copyright-protected digital goods (as, e.g., also e-books). This paper offers, in a first step, a systematic analysis and assessment of economic reasonings that have been discussed in the literature about exhaustion, and applies this framework, in a second step, to downloaded digital creative works. An important result is that digitalisation, on one hand, changes considerably the benefits and costs of exhaustion, esp. in regard to the danger of jeopardizing the incentives for copyright owners. On the other hand, however, also the costs of imposing restrictions might be high and even increase in a digital economy. This leads to the conclusion that it is necessary to think seriously about the legal limits for the restrictions that copyright owners should be allowed to impose on their customers. However, these limits might be drawn also by other legal instruments than copyright exhaustion.
Subjects: 
digital goods
copyright exhaustion
first-sale doctrine
post-sale restrictions
JEL: 
K20
L86
O34
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
114.69 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.