Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/144419
Authors: 
Dhyne, Emmanuel
Fuss, Catherine
Mathieu, Claude
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper Research 207
Abstract: 
This paper examines whether multinational companies differ in their employment adjustment from domestic firms, on the basis of a panel of Belgian firms for the period 1997-2007. We focus on incumbent firms as, in general, they account for the largest fraction of net employment creation, especially among multinational firms (MNFs). We obtain structural estimates of adjustment cost parameters for blue-collar workers and white-collar workers, domestic firms, and MNFs. We find evidence of convex, asymmetric (in the sense that it is more expensive to downsize than to upsize) and cross adjustment costs (indicating costly substitution between workers). To adjust white-collar employment seems to be around half as costly for MNFs as for domestic firms. There is no difference between Belgian MNFs and foreign MNFs. A small fraction of the gap between the adjustment costs of MNFs and domestic firms may be explained by the use of fixed-term contracts and early retirement. Controlling for firm size does not yield robust conclusions; the cost advantage of MNFs may diminish, vanish or turn into a disadvantage.
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.59 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.