Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Cuyvers, Ludo
Dhyne, Emmanuel
Soeng, Reth
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper Research 206
We empirically investigate the effects of the internationalisation of Belgian firms on domestic demand for production and non-production workers, which are used as proxies for unskilled and skilled labour. Distinction is made between home-employment effects of firms’ internationalisation, through either international trade or outward foreign direct investment, in highincome countries and in low-income economies. The results of our econometric analysis, using data over 1997-2007, suggest that increasing import shares from low-income countries or investing in those countries significantly reduces demand for low-skilled labour, while it increases demand for skilled labour. An increase in exports generally raises the demand for production workers, while it reduces the demand for non-production workers. However, these effects are reversed in the case of exports to low-income countries. Considering the impact of FDI, our results tentatively suggest that the setting up of a new international investment project has a positive impact on demand for non-production workers one period before it is made. This positive effect is offset in the long run, particularly in the case of investment in low-income countries.
labour demand
international trade
outward FDI
skilled and unskilled labour
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
253.39 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.