Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/144248
Authors: 
Maes, Ivo
Year of Publication: 
2002
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper Research 34
Abstract: 
EMU is, to a large extent, the result of a process of Franco-German reconciliation and understanding. However, in the postwar period, there were significant differences in ideas and economic policy-making in Germany and France. France was dominated by the "tradition républicaine", giving a central role to the state in economic life. In Germany, the federal structure of the state went together with the social market economy. In this paper an analysis is presented of these differences in thought and economic policy-making, how they evolved through time, and how they contributed to shaping the nature and form of the European Union. The focus is on the Rome Treaties, the Werner Report and the Maastricht Treaty process.
Subjects: 
EMU
economic thought
economic policy-making
France
Germany
JEL: 
A11
B20
E58
F02
P16
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
182.22 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.