Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/142652
Authors: 
Yamamura, Eiji
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
EERI Research Paper Series 23/2012
Abstract: 
The Japanese General Social Survey was used to determine how individual preferences for income redistribution are affected by family structure, such as the number of siblings and birth order where individuals grow up. After controlling for various individual characteristics, the important findings were as follows. (1) The first-born child was less likely to prefer income redistribution when the child was male. However, such a tendency was not observed when the child was female. (2) The larger the number of elder brothers, the more likely an individual preferred income redistribution. However, the number of elder sisters did not affect the preference. (3) The number of younger siblings did not affect the preference for redistribution regardless of the sibling’s sex. These findings regarding the effect of birth order are not consistent with evidence provided by another study conducted in a European country.
Subjects: 
Inequality aversion
Redistribution
Family structure
Birth order
Siblings
JEL: 
D19
D30
D63
J13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.