Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/141646
Authors: 
Chu, Yu-Wei Luke
Gershenson, Seth
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 9887
Abstract: 
Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have passed medical marijuana laws. Previous research shows that these laws increase marijuana use among adults. In this paper, we estimate the effects of medical marijuana laws (MML) on secondary and post-secondary students' time use using time diaries from the American Time Use Survey. We apply a difference-in-differences research design and estimate flexible fixed effects models that condition on state fixed effects and state-specific time trends. We find that on average, part-time college students in MML states spend 42 fewer minutes on homework, 37 fewer minutes attending class, and 60 more minutes watching television than their counterparts in non-MML states. However, we find no effects of MMLs on secondary or full-time college students. These results provide evidence on the mechanisms through which marijuana use affects educational outcomes, young peoples' behavioral responses to MMLs (and reduced costs of obtaining marijuana), and that the impact of MMLs on student outcomes are heterogeneous and stronger among disadvantaged students.
Subjects: 
time use
medical marijuana
unintended consequences
JEL: 
I18
K32
K42
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
740.02 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.