Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/139956
Authors: 
Fahy, John C.
Year of Publication: 
1985
Citation: 
[Journal:] Intereconomics [ISSN:] 0020-5346 [Publisher:] Verlag Weltarchiv [Place:] Hamburg [Volume:] 20 [Year:] 1985 [Issue:] 1 [Pages:] 36-42
Abstract: 
As a result of dissatisfaction with existing multilateral institutions, the idea of establishing a developing countries' multilateral banking facility-the South Bank-was launched at the Fifth Summit Conference of the Non-Aligned Movement held in Colombo in 1976. Ever since then, the debate over whether such a facility is really needed and economically feasible has never come to a conclusion. This article reviews the proposed main structure of the South Bank and critically examines its efficacy as a financial intermediary.
Subjects: 
Development Financing
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.