Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/130840
Authors: 
Werner, Katharina
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
Passauer Diskussionspapiere: Volkswirtschaftliche Reihe V-73-16
Abstract: 
A long-standing - although not uncontested - view is that violent conflicts reduce average levels of trust. Other theoretical and empirical work emphasizes discriminatory effects, namely that conflicts may enhance ingroup trust and erode out-group trust. The present study combines a trust game and a questionnaire to investigate the impact of direct and indirect conflict exposure on trust between Muslim and Christian students in postconflict Maluku, Indonesia. Reduced average levels of trust are found for subjects who were indirectly exposed to the conflict. Discriminatory effects are related to direct exposure: Directly exposed subjects trust in-group members much more than out-group members. The rationale may be the following: Directly exposed subjects made negative experiences with outgroup members, but also experienced solidarity within their group during the conflict. Indirectly exposed subjects, on the other hand, heard about negative experiences of others without being sufficiently involved to have made such distinct experiences with in-group and out-group members. Unable to distinguish friend from foe, they reduce trust toward everyone.
Subjects: 
trust
conflict
direct exposure
indirect exposure
religion
discrimination
JEL: 
C93
Z12
Z13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
864.81 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.