Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/130697
Authors: 
Frame, W. Scott
Gerardi, Kristopher
Willen, Paul S.
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
Working Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 15-4
Abstract: 
In the aftermath of the global financial crisis, policymakers in the United States and elsewhere have adopted stress testing as a central tool for supervising large, complex, financial institutions and promoting financial stability. Although supervisory stress testing may confer substantial benefits, such tests are vulnerable to model risk. This paper studies the risk-based capital stress test conducted by the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight (OFHEO) for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the two government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs) that are central to the U.S. housing finance system. This research aims to identify the sources of the stress test's spectacular failure to detect the growing risk and ultimate financial distress at these GSEs as mortgage market conditions deteriorated in 2007 and 2008. The analysis focuses on a key element of OFHEO's stress test, the models used to predict default and prepayment of 30-year fixed-rate mortgages.
Subjects: 
bank supervision
stress test
model risk
residential mortgages
government-sponsored enterprises
JEL: 
G21
G23
G28
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
380.24 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.