Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/130392
Authors: 
Bahar, Dany
Rapoport, Hillel
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo Working Paper 5769
Abstract: 
Do migrants shape the dynamic comparative advantage of their sending and receiving countries? To answer this question we study the drivers of knowledge diffusion by looking at the dynamics of the export basket of countries, with particular focus on migration. The fact that knowledge diffusion requires direct human interaction implies that the international diffusion of knowledge should follow the pattern of international migration. This is what this paper documents. Our main finding is that migration, and particularly skilled immigration, is a strong and robust driver of productive knowledge diffusion as measured by the appearance and growth of tradable goods in the migrants’ receiving and sending countries. We find that a 10% increase in the stock of immigrants from countries exporters of a given product is associated with a 2% increase in the likelihood that the host country will start exporting that good “from scratch” in the following 10-year period. In terms of ability to expand the export basket of countries, a migrant with college education or above is about ten times more “effective” than an unskilled migrant. The results are robust to accounting for shifts in product-specific global demand, to excluding bilateral trade possibly generated by network effects, as well as to instrumenting for migration using a gravity model.
Subjects: 
migration
knowledge diffusion
comparative advantage
exports
JEL: 
F14
F22
F62
O33
D83
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.