Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/129997
Authors: 
Klein, Alexander
Crafts, Nicholas F. R.
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
School of Economics Discussion Papers 1514
Abstract: 
We investigate the role of industrial structure in labor productivity growth in U.S. cities between 1880 and 1930 using a new dataset constructed from the Census of Manufactures. We find that increases in specialization were associated with faster productivity growth but that diversity only had positive effects on productivity performance in large cities. We interpret our results as providing strong support for the importance of Marshallian externalities. Industrial specialization increased considerably in U.S. cities in the early 20th century, probably as a result of improved transportation, and we estimate that this resulted in significant gains in labor productivity.
Subjects: 
agglomeration economies
Jacobian externalities
manufacturing productivity
Marshallian externalities
industrial structure
JEL: 
N91
N92
O7
R32
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.