Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/129806
Authors: 
Lane, Tom
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
CeDEx Discussion Paper Series 2015-03
Abstract: 
Economists are increasingly using experiments to study and measure discrimination between groups. In a meta-analysis containing 447 results from 77 studies, we find groups significantly discriminate against each other in roughly a third of cases. Discrimination varies depending upon the type of group identity being studied: it is stronger when identity is artificially induced in the laboratory than when the subject pool is divided by ethnicity or nationality, and higher still when participants are split into socially or geographically distinct groups. In gender discrimination experiments, there is significant favouritism towards the opposite gender. There is evidence for both taste-based and statistical discrimination; tastes seem to drive the relatively strong discrimination with artificial identity, while statistical motivations moderate it. Relative to all other decision-making contexts, discrimination is much stronger when participants are asked to allocate payoffs between passive ingroup and out-group members. Students and non-students appear to discriminate equally.We discuss possible interpretations and implications of our findings.
Subjects: 
Discrimination
Meta-analysis
JEL: 
C92
D03
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
851.17 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.